MASTER PEACE IS GOING ALL THE WAY TO THE TOP

MASTER PEACE IS GOING ALL THE WAY TO THE TOP

Master Peace isn’t the type of person you can imagine doing well sitting around the house all day. “It’s driving me nuts,” he admits when he picks up the phone from his South London home. “This is very dodgy for me.”

Forever fueled by a seemingly boundless energy, the 20-year-old native of Morden, England born Peace Okezie has been developing an audacious blend of punk, pop, and rap primed for crossover success. Despite his rapidly growing profile, his recorded music remains rare — with just one solo single, “Night Time,” currently available on streaming services. Peace has been cautious around committing his music to the internet while investing his time into artistic development. He’s crafted his sound in real time, from sweaty Shoreditch basement shows to national tours with fellow boundary pushers Wiki and Bakar. One video on YouTube captures the essence of his live show as he showcases mostly unreleased songs during a 20-minute Keep Hush set, while another, a session recorded by grime documentarians Tim & Barry, highlights his cultural panache as he spits aggressive drill flows over a-ha’s ’80s new wave classic “Take On Me,” polarizing the channel’s viewers in the process.

Shirt by PRONOUNCE / Durag (throughout) MODEL’S OWN
Shirt by PRONOUNCE / Durag (throughout) MODEL’S OWN
HIGHSNOBIETY / SABB ADAMS
He’s been spending his time in quarantine binge-watching Come Dine With Me, the Channel 4 reality TV series in which contestants host dinner parties for each other in an attempt to bag a cash prize. “It looks lit,” he declares, expressing an interest in getting involved in the future. “I fully would. I was watching yesterday and I was like, ‘£1000 prize?’ I’d literally win that hands down. I’d whip up something proper. A quick live performance and stuff.”

Like many young Londoners, Peace’s route into music participation came through grime. This wasn’t so much a stylistic choice as the only option that he considered: the culture of grime offered an accessible way of self-expression, it felt available to him and his friends. “That’s the roots. I loved it. I loved the whole energy of it. It felt like a sport, because you’re trying to be the best out of your peers,” he explains. “My thought process of making music was going to spray grime and having fun with my mates. We didn’t really think of it like ‘Ah yeah we want to be big global superstars.’ We were just like, yeah we want to spray and that’s it really. And then that turned into me taking it a bit more seriously in a sense.”

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